Feb 25, 2009

Lesson 4 - Basic Chords - Pt. 4

Let's cover another basic chord concept.  The same chord can be played in different ways or with different fingering.  To illustrate this concept, we will be playing G Major.

Here is the tab for G Major:
  1. |--2-- E <-- 3rd Finger (Ring)
  2. |--0-- B 
  3. |--0-- G 
  4. |--0-- D
  5. |--2-- A <-- 1st Finger (Index)
  6. |--3-- E <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)

Here is the freboard diagram:


And here is the actual fingering:

The G Major Video:



Ok, now G Major can be with different fingering and sound identical.  I prefer to play like this because I can switch faster from this position to a C or F Major Bar Chord (explained in the next post).  Here is the tab for this example:
  1. |--2-- E <-- 1st Finger (Index)
  2. |--0-- B 
  3. |--0-- G 
  4. |--0-- D
  5. |--2-- A <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)
  6. |--3-- E <-- 3rd Finger (Ring)
And here's what the fingering looks like:


The chord sounds exactly the same, so there's no need for another video.  Make sure you practice both of these fingerings, you may end up preferring one method over another in different songs.

G Major can be played another way in first position.  This time we add another G to the chord to create a "fuller" G sound.  Here's the tab:

  1. |--2-- E <--  4th Finger (Pinky)
  2. |--2-- B <--  3rd Finger (Ring)
  3. |--0-- G 
  4. |--0-- D
  5. |--2-- A <-- 1st Finger (Index)
  6. |--3-- E <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)
The freboard diagram:

The actual fingering:
And here's a video:



Notice a difference?  Perhaps you will when you hear them played in this next video.  Here I am alternating between the two:



Sick of G Major?  Next lesson we will be learning bar chords and power chords.

Feb 13, 2009

Inspirational Video 1: Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks - "Old Friends"

Every once in a while I will be linking some of my favorite acoustic performances for some inspiration. Here's a an example of two fantastic guitar players, Warren Haynes of Gov't Mule and Derek Trucks, guitar god. Enjoy!

Video courtesy of Youtuber ezekielwahwah.

Lesson 4 - Basic Chords - Pt. 3

Chords have "shapes". This is easily described by the A Minor chord. If you practice E Major, you will notice that the "shape" of the fingering is identical to A Minor. To illustrate this, consider the tab for A Minor:
  1. |--0-- E
  2. |--1-- B <-- 1st Finger (Index)
  3. |--2-- G <-- 3rd Finger (Ring)
  4. |--2-- D <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)
  5. |--0-- A
  6. |--0-- E
Notice how the tab is identical to E Major except it's shifted up? That's what I mean by shape. The fingering formation is exactly the same, but when moved, produces a different chord. This theme is applied to all kinds of chords, especially power and bar chords (which will be explained soon). Here's the fretboard diagram for A Minor (click for larger image):



The actual fingering:

The video:



Here's a chord every guitar player needs to know, C Major.
Tab for C Major:
  1. |--0-- E
  2. |--1-- B <-- 1st Finger (Index)
  3. |--0-- G
  4. |--2-- D <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)
  5. |--3-- A <-- 3rd Finger (Ring)
  6. |--0-- E
C Major fretboard diagram:

C Major actual fingering:


C Major video:



Our next chord is D Major.
D Major Tab:
  1. |--2-- E
  2. |--3-- B
  3. |--2-- G
  4. |--0-- D <-- 3rd Finger (Ring)
  5. |--0-- A <-- 2nd Finger (Middle)
  6. |--0-- E
Notice that some chords have many open strings (indicated by the zeroes). Try to strum only the relevant strings for the chord. With D Major, try only strumming from the D down. If you strum the bass notes (E and A), you may notice that the chord sounds funny. Some chords require you play the open notes and some not, just practice and you will find the correct sound.

D Major fretboard diagram:


D Major actual fingering:

D Major video: